Through many years and many attempts at being a dedicated writer, I’ve learned there’s a lot more to completing a novel than simply sitting down and putting pen to page. To write a book takes practice, planning, the formation of solid habits, and the strategic use of tools.

Having finally found my stride as a writer, ( I think!) I wanted to share some of the tools that have made my writing process far more productive and a heck of a lot easier.

Dragon Dictation

Writing a rough draft is arguably the hardest part of the writing process. And everyone has their own style: some prefer a desktop computer in a quiet office, others a laptop at the crowded coffee shop. I like to be alone and I like to be mobile, but above all, I need my rough draft to be hand-written.

I’ve tried a thousand times to type up my rough drafts but I just can’t get used to it. I’m not a bad typist; I grew up with computers and I type all day at work. But something about sitting at a keyboard and trying to conquer the always-intimidating  blank page kills my energy. I need real paper and a nice fountain pen or a crisp new mechanical pencil. I need to be able to write in the margins, to scribble and cross out and draw arrows. I write twice as fast, three times as more, and am infinitely more satisfied with the quality of my rough drafts when they’re handwritten. And, for years, this was one of my biggest roadblocks. How do I convert a messy handwritten draft into a typed piece, ready for edits, without sitting down and committing to the frustrating monotony of transcribing? I despised it and I wouldn’t do it. Anything I’d written would never make it to the computer screen, so writing anything at all seemed almost pointless. Then someone showed me Dragon Dictation.

Dragon Dictation is a free app that converts spoken word to text with surprising accuracy. Now, all I have to do is read my rough draft to my phone. Dragon is able to take fairly large chunks at a time and, once I’m done, I can highlight the block of text, copy, and save it out to my email or my google drive. It’s a simple, effective solution to a problem I’ve been battling for ages.

 

Forest & Ink On

forest1For managing my writing sessions, I use a combination of two apps: Forest & Ink On. Forest assists with productivity by helping me avoid distraction. It also acts as a timer for my session. I select how long I want to write and the app starts growing a fictional little tree. Backing out of the app to access the rest of my phone kills the session and my tree. It helps me cull the urge to pick up my phone and I don’t get sidetracked mid-session. Plus it doesn’t interfere with my music. (I usually listen to Spotify from my phone when I write) When the timer is up, it lets me know with a soft chime. Then I can record my progress in the Ink On app. Ink On lets me set up projects with their own individual goals and tracks my progress. It also gives me a calendar with writing totals for each day. I love it’s simple, clean interface. It’s become indispensable in tracking and managing my progress and goals.

inkon

Hemingway Editor

I love this site and I can’t wait to experiment with it more in my upcoming edits! This site is more than just a simple spelling & grammar check. The Hemingway Editor actually analyzes your writing for common draft problems. It highlights long, hard-to-read sentences,  complicated wording, adverbs, and use of passive voice. It’s a fantastic tool for self-edits; especially for someone like me, who can be a little blind to my own stylistic problems. While the site is free to use, you can also purchase your own personal copy (which includes offline use) for $9.99.

hemingway

Canva

When your project is finally complete, the next step is usually presentation.  Whether it be a full length novel, a short story, or a humble blog post, it’s always nice to have an appealing image complimenting your work. And unless you’re one of those ultra-talented types who’s good at both writing AND art, you may need a little help creating the perfect graphic. If you don’t have the contacts or the budget to get a professional, Canva works in a pinch. I especially like using it for temporary cover art, so I have something to make my works-in-progress stand out. It’s simple, easy to use, and inexpensive. A lot of the stock art is free and most of the fancier images are only a dollar each.

canva

And that’s about it! I hope you find some of these helpful in your own projects! If you have any neat apps or sites to share, please post them in the comments. Happy writing!

 

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